Advancing Healthcare for the people of North Shore, Rodney and Waitakere

Early birth, but in the best hands

"The last thing you want to see is your baby connected to a breathing machine with tubes down its throat. When you've just delivered your baby and you see that, it's horrifying. For me it hit how young and how unready he was for this world." Kara, with her son George, who was suddenly born premature.

Kara was in denial when she started to have contractions, because at 33 weeks pregnant the thought of having her baby early did not seem possible. "I had no awareness of pre-term babies, so when it happened I was a little confused."

It was after a dinner with friends that Kara started to have contractions. Thinking it was merely Braxton Hicks, she thought there was nothing to worry about.

But under the recommendation of her midwife, within an hour of arriving at the hospital Kara says it was all on. "We arrived at 8.30pm and George was born at 9.26pm. I remember thinking 'I'm not ready for this'."

Once George was born Kara says the nurses had to act quickly because he needed help to breathe. "The last thing you want to see is your baby connected to a breathing machine with tubes down its throat. When you've just delievered your baby and you see that, it's horrifying. For me it hit how young and how unready he was for this world."

But Kara says seeing her little boy for the first time was pure love. "I was amazed how beautifully formed he was. He was just this small 1.9 kilo baby."

Kara says the team at Waitakere Hospital Special Care Baby Unit where George stayed for over five weeks, was invaluable. "They helped me understand what George needed to go through in order to become a happy healthy full-term baby ready for the outside world."

Ways To Donate

Donate Now
Donate Options

Sign up to receive our news

SUBSCRIBE »

top